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Partial trail closure in Central Park near the Rotary Club off Guelph

Updated Aug. 1, 2018: I’ve received numerous questions about tree removal in the forest north of the Rotary Youth Centre in Central Park off of Guelph Line. A press release with background on the tree removals is below. Recently, staff provided some additional information about tree removal in this area:

“Trees that are a risk or that are within striking distance of an approved maintained trail, target as well as neighbouring private properties are being removed to mitigate potential public risk.

As part of the City of Burlington’s Council approved 2018 Emerald Ash Borer Action Plan (https://www.burlington.ca/en/services-for-you/Forestry-Operations.asp), the City of Burlington will be cutting and leaving logs and debris in Central Park and other naturalized areas.

However, due to the high number of removals in this area of Central Park, we have already committed additional funds to remove some logs and debris near Guelph Line.”

See My Take below, with proposed next steps.

Press Release – The City’s Roads, Parks & Forestry department have started the process for a partial trail closure in Central Park near the Rotary Club off Guelph Line. It is intended to be a permanent closure of a section of path that was originally a socially constructed pathway by the public. The intent is to let this area naturalize and regenerate due to the removal of ash trees from Emerald Ash Borer (EAB).

View a larger version of the map here.The public will still be able to access the path from the parking lot. The red line is the section of trail being closed and the blue dots are where “trail closed” signs will be installed.

 

My Take: I have recently met with staff to discuss reopening the trail. A “socially constructed” trail is the public telling us where you like to walk. Barring any safety or environmental concerns, we should embrace and adopt these trails, to encourage walking and being in nature. This area is well used by the public, and once the trees infected with EAB are taken down we should be looking at reopening this path. Staff will be bringing forward a plan during the next budget for managing areas like this, which are considered “wood lots.” I support looking at ways to provide resources to add these woodlot trails to our parks system.

Written by Marianne Meed Ward

A Better Burlington began in 2006 after my neighbours said they felt left out of city decisions, learning about them only after they’d been made.

As journalist for 22 years, I thought “I can do something about that” and a website and newsletter were born. They’ve taken various forms and names over the years, but the intent remains: To let you know what’s happening at City Hall before decisions are made, so you can influence outcomes for A Better Burlington.

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9 Comments

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  1. I enjoy walking to and through this small ‘forest’ and wondered how long it would take before those precious trees were destroyed and that piece of land was snatched up by yet another towering development or simply made unavailable to the public. Seems that our city will not be happy until every blade of grass is under concrete. The closing off of this small area will be a real loss for me as I live in an apartment and no longer have a garden. I’m with the young people who prefer to stay close to nature and wish to own a back yard. I hope for the best with the reforestation efforts but will believe it when I see it.

  2. There have been socially constructed trails for centuries. First we just called them trails. Later we called them roads. Anyway, my friends and I followed something we used to call ‘the creek’ that ran through there, as kids, and past the mushroom farm. Good luck with signs.

  3. I have been meaning to write you about this for a couple of years and certainly recently when I saw the devastation by the city workers. This precious natural resource has been hacked for years without any reforestation effort and is now practically denuded as a virtual monoculture of trees, unfortunately ash, had been allowed go fill in after the old forest was gradually cut out. This the “Spooky Hollow” of my childhood and I would hate to see this little bit of urban nature lost to future generations of children and their elders who love a quick walk in the woods. I would like to see a clear plan for its restoration and maintenance as a wooded park area.

  4. My backyard backs on to this woodlot trail. It has always been well used and definitely needs to be reopened. Some or all of the many large ash trees that have been cut down need to be removed as they are unsightly, inconvenient to walkers and potentially dangerous.

  5. Sad that we’re closing paths such as this one that serve as important connections for people in the community. Not everyone using these trails arrives by car.

    This would be a great location for a multi-use trail connecting Guelph Line with Cornick Drive, Courtland Drive, Teen Tour Way and all the amenities in and around Central Park.

What's your take?

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