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11 motions coming forward for downtown to balance development, protect heritage and greenspace, add affordable, assisted and family units, and delay approval of OP till after election

downtown heritage official plan
This heritage property is not formally designated and therefore can be torn down. The draft site plan proposed by staff for this location is 17 storeys.

 

I will be tabling 11 motions at today’s Planning & Development Committee on the proposed Official Plan changes to development rights downtown. The full list is below, and included in a revised memo (Jan 23 list of motions) that will be presented to committee. The new and revised motions are a result of additional material provided by staff, as well as ongoing conversations with staff, other councillors and the community.

I will also be providing an explanatory PowerPoint available here: Jan 23 P&D Downtown Mobility Slides final

I want to thank all members of the community who have spoken out on the downtown, whether for or against the new OP related to the downtown. I applaud the residents who will be attending or speaking at today’s meeting (at 1pm, continuing at 6:30 pm) The vast majority of residents I’ve heard from want changes to the proposed plan to bring balanced development downtown not overintensification.

If we don’t finish delegations and questions of staff today, additional time has been booked in our calendar Wednesday and Thursday to complete hearing and voting on motions (1pm and 6:30pm sessions, both days).

I will report to the community after tonight’s meeting.

MOTIONS:

To:                  Planning & Development Committee

Date:               Jan. 23, 2017

From:             Councillor Marianne Meed Ward

Re:                  Consolidated list of motions

Motion: 1
Defer approval of Official Plan till after the 2018 Municipal Election

Motion: 2
Direct staff to discuss with the Region and province the possibility of removing the mobility hub classification for the downtown, and shifting the Urban Growth Centre from downtown to the Burlington GO station.

Motion: 3
Direct staff to work with the Region of Halton to review the Downtown Urban Growth Centre boundaries, and consider restoring original boundaries with the exception of Spencer Smith Park.

Motion 4:
• 4A) Retain the current height restriction of 4 storeys (with permission to go to 8 storeys with community benefits) for the Downtown Core Precinct

  • 4B) Include a range of heights in the precinct, to help secure community benefits during redevelopment (retain “as of right” at 4 storeys)
  • 4C) Include policies to allow additional density in developments
    that preserve heritage buildings, as a factor of square footage preserved.

Motion 5:
5A) Height restriction of 3 storeys along Brant Street with permission to go to 11 storeys along John Street frontage only with the provision of
community benefits
. Addressed

  • 5B) Remove special policy area at the South East corner Brant/James.

(Note: Special policy area would allow up to 17 storeys)

Motion 6: Mid-Rise Residential Precinct:

  • 6A) Add the north west corner of Burlington Avenue and Lakeshore
    Road to the special planning area (6 storeys) to match the north east
    corner.
  • 6B) Retain height both sides to 3 storeys.

Motion 7: Cannery Precinct:
Reduce the cannery district at the north east corner of Lakeshore
Road and Brant Street to 15 storeys. (Currently proposed at 22)

Motion 8: Upper Brant Precinct:

  • 8A) Remove East side of Brant from Blairholm to Prospect
  • 8B) Remove West side of Brant from Blairholm to Olga

New Motion 9:

9A Remove park area of Lion’s Club park from St. Luke’s Precinct and add it to Downtown Parks and Promenades Precinct.

9B Retain existing development permission on South side (4-8 storeys)

New Motion 10:

Background: Official Plan Chapter 3 Section 3.1.1 (2)(i) requires a housing impact statement for developments that have “more than 200 dwelling units” to achieve affordable, special needs and assisted housing (i). That metric is too high. Instead, replace this metric with a percentage target for mid and high rise developments.

Motion: (Two parts)

10A . In the Official Plan Chapter 3 Section 3.1.1 (2)(i) delete “more than 200 dwelling units” and add a target percent of new mid-rise and high-rise units to achieve

  1. Affordable
  2. Assisted
  3. Special needs housing, as defined in Halton Region’s Annual State of Housing report

10B.  Add bullet (v) to achieve a minimum percent of new mid and high rise developments that shall be family units (minimum 3 bedrooms)

**New Motion 11:

Direct Staff to:

Proceed with the incorporation of the Downtown Mobility Hub Precinct Plan, as amended, into the New Official Plan, with the exception of the proposed Downtown Core precinct; and

Retain a maximum building height permission equal to the existing as-built building height which currently exist on properties within the proposed Downtown Core precinct area; and

Bring forward refined policies for the downtown precinct as part of the final Downtown Area Specific Plan

 

 

Written by Marianne Meed Ward

A Better Burlington began in 2006 after my neighbours said they felt left out of city decisions, learning about them only after they’d been made.

As journalist for 22 years, I thought “I can do something about that” and a website and newsletter were born. They’ve taken various forms and names over the years, but the intent remains: To let you know what’s happening at City Hall before decisions are made, so you can influence outcomes for A Better Burlington.

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